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Nathan Lowien

Master of Philosophy in Education

Nathan is currently undertaking a Master of Philosophy study in the Learning Sciences Institute Australia at the Australian Catholic University. He is interested in educational semiotics concerning videogames and other multimodal texts. Nathan has previously completed a Master of Education (coursework) and a Graduate Certificate in Scaffolding English for Speakers of Other Languages at the University of Canberra. During his time at the University of Canberra he received three Dean’s Excellence Awards and was awarded a membership to the Golden Key International Honour Society for being in the top 15% of the University in 2012. Nathan has worked as a primary school teacher in both Queensland and the Australian Capital Territory.

Research interests

  • Literacy education from Early Childhood, Adolescent and Adult years
  • Semiosis in videogame and multimodal texts
  • Multiliteracies and Information communication technology pedagogies
  • English as an Additional Language or Dialect
  • Critical Literacy

Publications

Publications

Lowien, N. (2016). The semiotic construction of values in the videogame Watch Dogs. English in Australia. 51(2)
Lowien, N. (2016). ‘It’s easy!’ Scaffolding literacy for teaching multimodal texts. Literacy Learning: The Middle Years, 24(1), 38-51.

Conference presentations

Lowien, N. (2016). The semiotic construction of attitude in videogames: Explicating the portrayal of values. Australian Systemic Functional Linguistics Association Conference. Sydney: Australian Catholic University.
Lowien, N. (2015). The Dark Knight and Dr Crane: The propriety of value positions in the videogame Batman Arkham Asylum. Symposium on Current Issues in Appraisal Theory and Practice. Sydney: University of New South Wales.
Lowien, N. (2015). The semiotic construction of evaluative stances in the videogame Watch Dogs. Australian Systemic Functional Linguistics Association Conference. Brisbane: The University of Queensland